Gordon Blue

jazzy - funky - emotional

aufregend neu - kompromisslos klassisch

Classic Rock hits with jazzy arrangements, an exceptional soulful singer, a vast deep bass player, an energetic South American drummer and an experienced leader and keyboard player.

Info

Gordon Blue spielt Jazz. Was aber haben "Smoke On The Water", "Radar Love" oder "In A Gadda Da Vida" in einem Jazzrepertoire zu suchen? Geht das überhaupt? "Speed King" als Latin Jazz? "Whole Lotta Love" als loungiger Swing? Oder ist es doch Rock?

Paul Anka hat es getan, Jazzkantine und andere auch. Sie alle haben dem ein oder anderen Rocksong eine jazzige Note verliehen, aber keiner betreibt dies so konsequent wie Gordon Blue. Hier kommen ausschließlich Rockklassiker zum Einsatz. Songs von Deep Purple, Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix, The Doors, Procol Harum, Golden Earring, Aerosmith, Iron Butterfly, Robert Palmer, James Taylor, Gary Moore, Marc Cohn, BTO, Lou Reed, Eric Clapton, The Who, Cat Stevens, Don McLean, Bruce Hornsby, Bryan Adams und vielen anderen.

Aus der Symbiose des bodenständigen Classic Rock mit der Raffinesse und Artenvielfalt des Jazz ensteht so eine neue Art der Darbietung, die überrascht und durch unerwartete Stil-Anleihen immer wieder verblüfft. Neu in einer solchen Konstellation sind auch die soul- und gospelorientierten Gesangsinterpretationen von Torsten Haus. Jazz Rock - im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes.

“ ...and I think the band sounds really great!" Eric Marienthal (Chick Corea, Lee Ritenour, Jeff Lorber)

“...just listened to the tracks...very cool, man!!" Jerry Goodman (The Flock, Mahavishnu Orchestra)

Weitere Infos Download (PDF 25,6 MB)
AirPlay Direct download for program directors, radio stations and DJs

Presse

Mi2N - Music Industry News Network

German band Gordon Blue delivers surprisingly jazzy covers of classic rock staples on new CD

Published: 12-10-2011 When a jazz act decides to record an album of covers, the selections are usually predictable; they’re often note-for-note versions of standards by Cole Porter, George Gershwin, and Irving Berlin. On their latest album “The Hippie Standards,” the German band Gordon Blue decided to do something completely different: jazzy makeovers of classic-rock radio hits. It’s an idea that can rankle both jazz and rock traditionalists, but Gordon Blue are absolutely serious; these covers are not silly nor are they disrespectful to the original material.

The problem with most remakes is that they sound too much like what was previously released; if that’s the case, then what is the point? However, when Gordon Blue repurposes Lou Reed’s “Walk on the Wild Side” as sprightly piano jazz, it is a fresh, utterly unique take that breathes new life into an overplayed oldie. “I picked some well-known and beaten songs that everybody knows,” pianist/keyboardist Udo Sailer explained. “To paint these songs in new colors was a fascinating challenge.” It may not have been easy, but Gordon Blue have successfully changed the identity of these tunes while still retaining their initial flavor. For example, Led Zeppelin’s “Whole Lotta Love” hasn’t lost its punch; the main difference is that this time it’s brought upon by Sailer’s flowing piano instead of Jimmy Page’s fiery guitar.

Gordon Blue was formed in 2010 by Sailer, vocalist Torsten Haus, bassist Boris Friedel, and drummer/percussionist Daniel Messina. Sailer discovered most of the members through the Internet, and the group is a unique entity in Germany’s jazz scene. “The musicians in Germany try to find their own European identity. Some have found it like Eberhard Weber, Till Brönner, and Michael Wollny; others are still searching,” Sailer revealed. “For our band I can say that we don't have that ambition. We just play and have a lot of fun, and so does our audience.”When a jazz act decides to record an album of covers, the selections are usually predictable; they’re often note-for-note versions of standards by Cole Porter, George Gershwin, and Irving Berlin. On their latest album “The Hippie Standards,” the German band Gordon Blue decided to do something completely different: jazzy makeovers of classic-rock radio hits. It’s an idea that can rankle both jazz and rock traditionalists, but Gordon Blue are absolutely serious; these covers are not silly nor are they disrespectful to the original material.

The problem with most remakes is that they sound too much like what was previously released; if that’s the case, then what is the point? However, when Gordon Blue repurposes Lou Reed’s “Walk on the Wild Side” as sprightly piano jazz, it is a fresh, utterly unique take that breathes new life into an overplayed oldie. “I picked some well-known and beaten songs that everybody knows,” pianist/keyboardist Udo Sailer explained. “To paint these songs in new colors was a fascinating challenge.” It may not have been easy, but Gordon Blue have successfully changed the identity of these tunes while still retaining their initial flavor. For example, Led Zeppelin’s “Whole Lotta Love” hasn’t lost its punch; the main difference is that this time it’s brought upon by Sailer’s flowing piano instead of Jimmy Page’s fiery guitar.

Gordon Blue was formed in 2010 by Sailer, vocalist Torsten Haus, bassist Boris Friedel, and drummer/percussionist Daniel Messina. Sailer discovered most of the members through the Internet, and the group is a unique entity in Germany’s jazz scene. “The musicians in Germany try to find their own European identity. Some have found it like Eberhard Weber, Till Brönner, and Michael Wollny; others are still searching,” Sailer revealed. “For our band I can say that we don't have that ambition. We just play and have a lot of fun, and so does our audience.”


JazzCorner

German band Gordon Blue delivers surprisingly jazzy covers of classic rock staples on new CD

August 30, 2011 (Speyer, Germany) Written by Robert Sutton. Although they seem to be immune to the rust of old age, even the classics can grow moldy, especially through oversaturation on classic-rock radio. Perhaps the German band Gordon Blue were thinking in a similar fashion when they decided to unleash The Hippie Standards, a collection of snappy jazz makeovers of mostly AOR staples from the ‘70s.

The group certainly has fine taste. Lou Reed remains an underappreciated talent in flower power nostalgia, probably because he didn't belong to the long-haired crowd to begin with. In fact, Reed's highly influential yet commercially unpopular late ‘60s proto punk outfit the Velvet Underground was the antithesis of the hippie movement. His solo single, "Walk on the Wild Side," from 1972, received surprising airplay at that time, shocking considering its lyrical references to prostitution, drugs, and oral sex. The post-Vietnam War college kids of the early ‘70s probably appreciated it more than the Haight-Ashbury pot smokers did, which is likely why it's barely heard on classic rock radio these days. Its inclusion on The Hippie Standards is a surprise treat, and so is Gordon Blue's rendition of it, transforming Reed's minimalist drone and spoken-word poetry into a groovy jazz track with lively piano and jumpy percussion. Vocalist Torsten Haus has a smooth delivery that makes Reed's wickedly funny lyrics more startling.

Formed in 2010 by Haus, pianist/keyboardist Udo Sailer, bassist Boris Friedel, and drummer/percussionist Daniel Messina, Gordon Blue flirt with parody when doing jazzy covers of established classic rock tunes; however, their affection and respect for the material end up invigorating these played-out songs. Led Zeppelin's dive bombing 1970 shrapnel "Whole Lotta Love" doesn't lose its power when Sailer adapts Jimmy Page's swooping riffs into crystalline piano melodies although it's different hearing the words without Robert Plant's Godzilla roar. However, that's the whole point of the project - to make something new out of the too familiar.

When Gordon Blue cools off Deep Purple's fiery cannonball "Smoke on the Water" into soothing piano jazz, it's a welcome change and simply proves that the originals were built to last. "I picked some well-known, beaten songs, that everybody knows," Sailer explained. "To paint these songs in new colors was a fascinating challenge." And it's one that Gordon Blue accomplishes effortlessly.


All About Jazz

German band Gordon Blue remodels classic rock staples into solid jazz songs

Published: 2011-10-17 Classic rock is new again.

To the German band Gordon Blue, the FM radio staples of the '70s still have life in them. However, don't expect the group to unleash Led Zeppelin's “Whole Lotta Love" with the stadium-blasting power metal of the 1970 original. Instead, Gordon Blue remodels it as chilled-out piano jazz. Guitar purists may either be perplexed or outraged by the jazzy interpretations that Gordon Blue has compiled on their new album, The Hippie Standards, but there's no denying the respect and affection the band has for the original material.

In 1997, '50s teen idol Pat Boone release his own collection of jazzed-up hard rock anthems with In a Metal Mood: No More Mr. Nice Guy, but Gordon Blue doesn't sink to its tongue-in-cheek treatment. Instead, this is a solid jazz record. Pianist/keyboardist Udo Sailer discusses the history of the group for an international audience that might not be aware of them yet.

Q: How did the band get together and when did it form?

A: I've played together with the bassist Boris Friedel before. The others I searched for over the Internet. I didn't want to have a typical jazz singer, but a singer with soul who can handle the chord changes going on in jazz music. I found Torsten Haus on a page of a girl singer friend of mine. There he sang a duet with her and when I heard that, I said, “Wow, that is what I was looking for." I wrote an e-mail and had an answer immediately: Yes. A week later, he told me that he first wanted to refuse that invitation, but when he heard my demos he couldn't say no anymore. I also found our drummer Daniel Messina over the Internet. He had a very good reputation already, playing with Barbara Dennerlein for 12 years, around the world and on several CDs. He played with Ernie Watts, Chico Freeman, and a lot of other well known musicians in Europe.

Q: Who came up with the idea of doing jazz makeovers of rock classics?

A: That was me.

Q: What is the jazz scene in Germany like?

A: The jazz scene in Germany is rising due to our very good schools, i.e., Staatliche Hochschule für Musik und Darstellende Musik in Mannheim which has very good teachers for jazz and pop. So there are a lot of well-educated young students on the growing market. The musicians in Germany try to find their own European identity. Some have found it like Eberhard Weber, Till Brönner, and Michael Wollny; others are still searching. For our band I can say that we don't have that ambition. We just play and have a lot of fun, and so does our audience.

Q: How were the covers on the album selected?

A: I picked some well-known and beaten songs that everybody knows. To paint these songs in new colors was a fascinating challenge.

Videos






Find Gordon Blue on Facebook regioactive.de